Tips for Teachers

Tweet me Like me on Facebook Email me

Early learning teachers in preschools, child care centres, crèches and schools can help prepare the children in their care for early literacy learning. The sooner, the better. It is all about quality language and talking and listening activities. It is not hard to do once you have planned and programmed for which Phonological Awareness skills are going to be taught.

If you would like to learn more about Phonological Awareness, please click here.

As a quick guide, here is a checklist of Phonological Awareness skills that children need.

Checklist for Teachers

Counting words in a sentence

•   Can the children point to words in a book and count the words?
•   Can the children count the spaces between the words in a book?

Counting syllables in words

Can the children clap syllables in words?

•   1 syllable words (For example: boy/ mum/ dog/ house/ food/ school)
•   2 syllable words (For example: but/ter, pup/py, teach/er, sal/ad)
•   3 syllable words (For example: el/e/phant, bi/cy/cle, fam/i/ly)
•   4 syllable words (For example: cat/er/pill/ar, hel/i/cop/ter,)

Hearing beginning sounds in 2 words

Can the children hear that the words 'fat' and 'fun' START with the same sound and say that starting sound back to you? ('f')

Hearing final sounds in 2 words

Can the children hear that the words 'dog' and 'rug' END with the same sound and say that ending sound back to you ('g')?

Identifying 2 words that rhyme

Can the children recognize that the words 'man' and 'fan' are words that rhyme?

Creating new rhyming words

Can the children say the words 'man/fan' and make a new rhyming word to match (any word that ends in 'an' is fine: 'ran, plan, span')?

Identifying 2 words that do not rhyme

Can the children hear that the words 'long' and 'fan' do NOT rhyme?

Hearing single intial sounds in words

Can the children hear that when you say the word 'dad' that it starts with the sound 'd'? Ask them to say the first sound in these words:   mum 'm'    sun 's'    apple 'a'    toe 't'    girl 'g'    run 'r'    horse 'h'

Blending

Can the children say what the word is when it is stretched out for them?

• 2 sound words: Say the sounds 'i/n/' The child says the word 'in'; Say the sounds 'a/t/' They say the word 'at'; Say the sounds 'u'/p'/' The child says the word 'up'
• 3 sound words: Say the sounds 'b/i/n/' The child says the word 'bin'; Say the sounds 'c/a/t/' The child says the word 'cat'; Say the sounds 'd/o/g/' The child says the word 'dog'
• 4 sound words: Say the sounds 'c/l/o/ck/ The child says the word 'clock'; Say the sounds 's/t/e/p/' The child says the word 'step'; Say the sounds 'b/a/n/k/' The child says the word 'bank'

Segmenting

Can the children stretch words into sounds?

• 2 sound words (an, is, it, on) a/n/, i/s/, i/t/, o/n/
• 3 sound words (mum, can, sit, wet) m/u/m/, c/a/n/, s/i/t/, w/e/t/
• 4 sound words (hand, soft, went, jump) h/a/n/d/, s/o/f/t/, w/e/n/t/, j/u/m/p/

Say the word to the child
Child repeats the word
Stretch the word out into its sounds
Child then sounds out each sound
Count the sounds out on your fingers

Hearing single middle sounds in words

Can the children hear the middle vowel sound in:

• 'rang' 'a'
• 'ring' 'i'
• 'rung' 'u'

Deleting and exchanging sounds in words

Deleting and exchanging sounds in words is a more advanced skill, usually acquired at the end of the first year of formal schooling (Kindergarten in NSW).

Deleting sounds in words is when children can take away a sound in a word and say what is left. E.g. Say the word 'spot' now take away the sound 's'. What word is left ('pot')? This is without the word in front of them. It means that they are relying on hearing the sounds rather than seeing or reading them. They should be able to do this without the word in front of them.

Exchanging sounds in words s when children can take away a sound in a word and exchange or put in another sound to replace the first sound. E.g. Say the word 'stop' now take out the 't' sound and change it to an 'l' sound. What is this new word ('slop')? This is without the word in front of them. It means that they are relying on hearing the sounds rather than seeing or reading them. They should be able to do this without the word in front of them.

 

Download the Teacher Guides

Download Carlos the Caterpillar teacher guide Download Andrea the Ant teacher guide Download Benita the Bee teacher guide Download Izzy the Lizard teacher guide Download Sammy the Slug teacher guide

Buy the books (English versions)

Buy the books Five books Five books Five books Five books Five books Five books